Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Fun times . . . not!

Fri., July 5, 1935 - We slept late and played lazy all day.  Ray came home in the p.m.  He and Willie Stahl are leaving for the harvest fields Monday.  Picked peas this evening.
Sat., July 6, 1935 - I got up at 5:00 this a.m.  Washed clothes.  Ray, Grandad, and Mom went to Wayne over noon.  Canned 5 pints of peas.  Edwin came up this p.m. and told us about the Kahler family reunion tomorrow at Willie Kahlers.
Sun., July 7, 1935 - Mom, Ray, Uncle Hans, Aunt Emma, Sophia, Walter K. and I went to Dakota City today.  We left here at 11:50 and didn't get there until 3:00!  We didn't start sooner because Ray went up to Uncle Hans' last nite.  It rained there this morning and they needed chains on to get here.  On the way there we had 2 flat tires and car trouble, the engine didn't get gas the way it should.  Walter went along with us because his folks left half an hour before he got here from Norfolk.  He went home with his folks.  We left there at 8:00, got to Aunt Emma's at 10:00.  We had a lunch there before we took Uncle Hans home and then came to Winside.

What a heck of a time getting to a reunion they only heard about the day before.  I did not know any of the Kahlers lived near Dakota City, but I am not really versed on that branch of the family tree.  I guess Grussmother was not feeling well?

From Dakota City's website:

     One of Nebraska's oldest communities, the site of Dakota City, was first visited by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which reached the mouth of Omaha Creek on August 16, 1804. A town was not advanced until the location was designated as county seat shortly after Dakota County was established in 1855. A town site was platted the following year. J. D. M.Crockwell, an agent for the Dakota City Land Company formed by Augustus Kountze, chose the name in honor of the Dacotah (Sioux) Indians.

     The original plat called for a town two-miles wide from east to west, with its eastern end abutting the Missouri River. Broadway was to be 150 feet wide with plans for the construction of a "center canal" which could bring barges directly into the town. Showing remarkable growth, Dakota City was incorporated on April 5, 1858.

     Today our town contains 21 miles of streets, of which nine miles are hard-surfaced. Dakota City is adjacent to the four-lane highways of 77 & 20, making it only minutes away from Sioux City, and Iowa's newest and largest shopping center, Southern Hills Mall.

     Recreation focuses on the river, which is readily accessible in Cotton Wood Cove Park. There are 16 acres of land per 1,000 population devoted to parks, playgrounds, athletic fields and courts.

     Schools, with a long tradition of growth, reflected the need for reorganization in the 1960s. At that time a K-4 elementary unit was retained in Dakota City, with all other grades attending classes in South Sioux City.

     Dakota City has the first Lutheran church building built in Nebraska, the Emmanuel Lutheran Church, a Greek Revival style structure built in 1860. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

     The first pastor was the Reverend Henry W. Kuhns, who was a missionary sent by the Allegheny Synod to Nebraska Territory. Rev. Kuhns first preached in the front room of Bates House, a hotel, in November of 1850. The church was formally organized July 22, 1859.

     Plans were started for the building of the church, but their idea of moving an abandoned store from the abandoned town of Pacific City came to an end when a prairie fire destroyed the building as it was being moved to Dakota City. The present church was designed and built by Augustus T. Haase, a local carpenter and a member of the Emmanuel Lutheran congregation, at a total cost of $2,000. The building also served periodically as a Territorial courthouse, and religious services were still held on Sunday as usual. The church stands today as a proud monument to the tenacity and strength of purpose of the early Dakota County settlers.

     The church was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969.

The photo is of the church, grabbed from wikipeda.  There was a nice train photograph on the Dakota City website, and I wanted to use it for Wayne's sake, but I was not able to copy the image.

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